Ultra-Processed Foods Linked to Higher Coronary Artery Disease Risk

Ultra-processed versus processed?

What are ultra-processed foods? I’m not paying $35 for the scientific article to find out. If you can grab the definition from your copy, please share in the Comments section. The 2020 profit from my publishing company was only $937.08, so I’m watching my expenses.

Here’s the free abstract:

ABSTRACT

Background

Higher ultra-processed food intake has been linked with several cardiometabolic and cardiovascular diseases. However, prospective evidence from US populations remains scarce.

Objectives

To test the hypothesis that higher intake of ultra-processed foods is associated with higher risk of coronary artery disease.

Methods

A total of 13,548 adults aged 45–65 y from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study were included in the analytic sample. Dietary intake data were collected through a 66-item FFQ. Ultra-processed foods were defined using the NOVA classification, and the level of intake (servings/d) was calculated for each participant and divided into quartiles. We used Cox proportional hazards models and restricted cubic splines to assess the association between quartiles of ultra-processed food intake and incident coronary artery disease.

Results

There were 2006 incident coronary artery disease cases documented over a median follow-up of 27 y. Incidence rates were higher in the highest quartile of ultra-processed food intake (70.8 per 10,000 person-y; 95% CI: 65.1, 77.1) compared with the lowest quartile (59.3 per 10,000 person-y; 95% CI: 54.1, 65.0). Participants in the highest compared with lowest quartile of ultra-processed food intake had a 19% higher risk of coronary artery disease (HR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.35) after adjusting for sociodemographic factors and health behaviors. An approximately linear relation was observed between ultra-processed food intake and risk of coronary artery disease.Conclusions

Higher ultra-processed food intake was associated with a higher risk of coronary artery disease among middle-aged US adults. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and to investigate the mechanisms by which ultra-processed foods may affect health.

Article

I admit I must eat some ultra-processed foods, but I try to limit them.

Heart disease is the #1 killer in the developed world, even more lethal the COVID19! If you haven’t chosen your New Years’ weight-loss diet yet, consider one low in ultra-processed foods, like the paleo diet or Mediterranean diet.

This Shrimp Salad is minimally-processed

Steve Parker, M.D.

2 responses to “Ultra-Processed Foods Linked to Higher Coronary Artery Disease Risk

  1. Pingback: Ultra-Processed Foods Linked to Higher Coronary Artery Disease Risk – Diabetic Daily

  2. Pingback: Ultra-Processed Foods Linked to Higher Coronary Artery Disease Risk - Diet Diabetes

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