Category Archives: Recipes

Check Out DietDoctor’s Improved Low-Carb Recipe Collection

That's a guacamole deviled egg

That’s a guacamole deviled egg

They’ve always been good recipes—accompanied by all-important nutrient analysis—but they’re even better now. They’re not necessarily paleo-compliant, but many of them are.

From DietDoctor:

“Our low-carb recipe site is probably already the most popular one in the world, with over 100,000 daily pageviews, several hundred recipes and gorgeous images. Now we’re adding even more great functions.You can now change the number of servings for recipes – the ingredient amount will correspond to the number of servings – and you can now also choose between the US or the metric measurement systems for ingredients. All to make it simpler to use our recipes.

We’ve also added a function for members so that it is now possible to save your personal favorite recipes. To activate the latter feature you need to be logged in, so that your selections can be saved for later.”

Source: The World’s Best Low-Carb Recipes Just Got Better – Diet Doctor

Free “Paleo Asian Cookbook” From Alfie Mueeth

Author Alfie Mueeth tells me via email that his new recipe book will be available for free “tomorrow.” I don’t know what time zone Alfie’s in, so I don’t know when tomorrow starts and stops. Tomorrow for me is December 7.

The link Alfie gave me is https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01MPX9QNF?utm_content=buffer46c9c&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

or

http://track.mlsend3.com/link/c/YT01MTEzMDY3MzA5OTEyNTczMzAmYz1pMHQ0JmU9MTkyOCZiPTcyNTkxMjkzJmQ9cDJjNGYxYw==.56-8LPN0zt_VA7GZZp3yT19Dx9eAL27uPihfIUDVf_M

Why Not Try Gazpacho?

These are Hass or California avocados (the other common one in the U.S is the Florida avocado)

These are Hass or California avocados (the other common one in the U.S is the Florida avocado)

Here’s a recipe from The Low Carb Diabetic blog, one of my favorites. No carb count is provided but I bet it’s relatively low. If you know the carb count per serving, share in the comments. Calculate the carbs yourself at FitDay. Click the link below for the recipe. It’s paleo-diet compliant, if you don’t mind vinegar. A snippet:

“Gazpacho is a soup made of raw vegetables and served cold, usually with a tomato base, originating in the southern Spanish region of Andalucia, which some spell with a c, while others use an s! This soup can be great for a hot day when making a lunch that takes just a few minutes is exactly what you want. In our version of this Andalusian peasant dish we leave out the soaked bread and instead use a creamy avocado to give it substance.”

Source: The Low Carb Diabetic: Gazpacho – A taste of Andalucia

Recipe: Chicken Avocado Soup

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This blew my mind. Avocados in soup? Yeah, I was skeptical, too. But it works amazingly well. Since I provide the nutritional analysis below, you can easily work this into the Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet, Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet, Paleobetic Diet, or Advanced Mediterranean Diet.

Ingredients

1.5 lb (680 g) boneless skinless chicken breast

1 tbsp (15 ml) olive oil

1 cup (240 ml) chopped green onions

1/2 jalapeno pepper (or 1 or 2 peppers if you wish), seeded and minced (use the seeds, too, if you want it very spicy hot)

2 roma tomatoes (5 oz or 140 g), seeded and diced

2 garlic cloves, minced

60 oz (1,700 g) low-sodium chicken broth

salt and pepper to taste (nutritional analysis below assumes no salt added)

1/2 tsp (2.5 ml) ground cumin

1/3 cup (80 ml) chopped cilantro

3 tbsp (45 ml) fresh lime juice (2 limes should be enough)

3 medium California avocados, peeled, seeded, and cubed

Instructions

Heat up the olive oil in a large pot over medium heat, then add the green onions and jalapeño; sauté until tender (1–2 minutes) then add the garlic and cook another 30 seconds or so. Next into the pot goes the chicken broth, cumin, tomatoes, chicken breasts, and optional salt and pepper. If adding salt, I’d wait until just before serving: taste it and then decide if it needs salt. Bring to a boil with high heat, then reduce heat but keep it boiling, covering with a lid while the chicken cooks through-out. Cooking time depends on thickness of the breasts and may be 15 to 45 minutes. When done, it should be easy to shred with a fork. Reduce heat to low or warm then remove the chicken breasts and allow them to cool for 5–10 minutes. When cool enough, shred the chicken with your fingers and return it to the pot. Add the cilantro. Ladle 1.5 cups (355 ml) into a bowl, add one fifth or sixth of the avocado cubes (half of an avocado) and the juice of 1/4 to 1/2 lime. Enjoy!

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Serving size: 1.5 cup of soup plus 1/2 of an avocado

Servings per Batch: 5

Advanced Mediterranean Diet boxes: 1 veggie, 1 fat, 1 protein

Nutritional Analysis per Serving:

43 % fat

13 % carbohydrate

44 % protein

350 calories

12 g carbohydrate

8 g fiber

4 g digestible carb

638 mg sodium

1,180 mg potassium

Prominent features: Rich in protein, vitamin B6, vitamin C, niacin, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, selenium; plus a fair amount of fiber

PS: If you’re not eating pure paleo, you can fancy this up just before serving by adding a couple large triangular corn tortilla chips (broken into a few bits) or half of a 6-inch (15 cm) corn tortilla (first, microwave for 20 seconds, then break into chunks). Both items each add 5 g of digestible carbohydrate; the tortilla chip option adds 60 calories and the corn tortilla adds 25 calories. Shredded cheese might be a nice topper, too.

 

A New Cookbook: Does “Primal” Now Always Refer to Mark Sisson’s Version of the Paleo Diet?

Carolyn at All Day I Dream About Food brought my attention to a new cookbook called The Primal Low-Carb Kitchen, by Kyndra Holley.

The book’s detail page at Amazon.com doesn’t define “primal.”

When I see the word “primal,” I think of Mark Sisson’s version of the paleo diet. I’m no expert on Mark’s diet, but off the top of my head I know it includes dairy products. Also, one of the Amazon reviews of The Primal Low-Carb Kitchen mentions use of green beans, a staple in low-carb diets but not considered “paleo” by many because they’re legumes. So a paleo purist will find some recipes they won’t use.

You can’t please everybody. A reviewer of my Paleobetic Diet (barebones version) didn’t like it because she was expecting a raw-foods diet and also didn’t appreciate my allowance of canned tuna. (BTW, if you want that barebones version, you might grab it now because I’m thinking about killing it.)

Anyway…

I bring this to your attention mainly for the book’s inclusion of basic nutritional analysis like carb counts and calories. That’s important if you have diabetes, prediabetes, or are overweight. I wish more paleo diet cookbooks provided the same info.

If I’m wrong about Kyndra’s book being paleo-friendly, let me know.

Steve Parker, M.D.

Time-Saving Tip: Microwave Your Spaghetti Squash

The pale yellow half-squash is cooked. The meaty red sauce is low-carb.

Both of these weighed about 4 pounds (1.8 kg). The pale yellow half-squash is cooked. The meaty red sauce is low-carb.

My wife found this new spaghetti squash cooking method—new to us at least—on a sticker attached to a squash. We tried it and the finished product is the same as if done in the traditional oven baking way. The whole process just takes 15 minutes. Here it is:

Hope you can read it

Hope you can read it

A different squash had a different stuck-on cooking method that involved both microwaving AND oven baking. Why make it so complicated?

It takes no skill at all to make it look like spaghetti pasta

It takes no skill at all to make it look like spaghetti pasta

 

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In the northern hemisphere, the spaghetti squash season is autumn and winter. Purchasing in spring and summer may be iffy. We tried one out of season and it was inedible. In case you’re eating paleo-style, the following recipes are paleo-diet-compliant.

Spaghetti Squash Recipes

Low-Carb Spaghetti Sauce

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IMG_1437

 

 

Recipe: Frozen Fruit Smoothie #2

 

Similar to an Icee, but healthier for you

Similar to an Icee, but healthier for you

Try this for dessert instead of calorie-laden items like pie, cake, cookies, and ice cream. Unlike this smoothie, those aren’t very nutrient-dense, either. Since I provide the nutritional analysis below, you can easily incorporate this into most diabetic diets, such as the Paleobetic Diet. Most diabetics need to limit their carbohydrate consumption. Twelve fl oz of this smoothie has almost 40 digestible carb grams, so you may need to reduce the serving size or eat few other carbohydrates with your meal.

At the Parker Compound, we mix this in a Vitamix. Other devices may work, but I’m not familiar with them.

It's all here

It’s all here

Ingredients

1 cup (240 ml) frozen raspberries

1/2 cup (120 ml) frozen blueberries

1 cup (240 ml) frozen strawberries

1 frozen banana (7 inches or 18 cm), cut into 3–4 pieces

1 tbsp (13 g) chia seeds

1 handful (1/2 ounce?) raw kale

2.5 cups (590 ml) water

1 cup (240 ml) ice cubes

Instructions

First item into the Vitamix is the water, then banana, all berries, chia seeds, then top off with the ice. Start mixing on variable speed 1 then slowly increase spin rate to 10, for a total mix of 45–60 seconds. Soon after you get started you’ll probably have to use the “plunger” a few times to un-clump the top items.

Loaded and ready to spin

Loaded and ready to spin

Depending on your batch of fruits, this drink may not be as sweet as you like. You could easily sweeten it up with your favorite artificial non-caloric sweetener. I used 1.5 tsp (7.5 ml) of Truvia to good effect, just thrown in with every thing else before or after the primary mix. Or you could use table sugar, about 4 tsp (20 ml), instead of the Truvia. Most of us eat too much sugar. If you go the sugar route, you’ll increase the calories per serving by 15, and increase carbohydrate grams by 4 per serving.

My able assistant wields the plunger

My able assistant wields the plunger

Number of Servings: 3.5 servings of 12 fl oz (350 ml) each

Advanced Mediterranean Diet boxes: 2 and 1/2 fruits

Nutritional Analysis per Serving:

7% fat

90% carbohydrate

3% protein

190 calories

46 g carbohydrate

7 g fiber

39 g digestible carbohydrate

5 mg sodium

290 mg potassium

Prominent features: Rich in vitamin C, fair amount of fiber, homeopathic amounts of sodium

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: I credit my wife with this recipe.

 

What’s Your Favorite Paleo Diet Cookbook?

Would you help me out and tell me your favorite paleo diet cookbooks, and perhaps why? My patients are asking me for paleo diet recipes, and I need more sources. 

Ideally, I’d like authors who avoid or minimize use of dairy products, legumes, grains, and industrial seed oils. My favorite version of paleo is Loren Cordain’s. Let’s also minimize hard-to-find or esoteric ingredients. I don’t care whether or not the beef is pastured or if the chickens are free-range happy ones. Prep time under 30 minutes is always appreciated. I would love to have basic nutritional analysis such as digestible (net) carb grams, calories per serving, and percentage of calories from fat, protein, and carbohydrate.

I’m afraid I’m going to have to do the nutritional analyses myself, as I have with my Paleobetic Diet recipes.

Here’s one that I haven’t read yet but have great expectations that it’s good: 500 Paleo Recipes by Dana Carpenter. I’ve read several of her non-paleo low-carb cookbooks and they’re good. Her 500 Paleo Recipes book provided some basic nutritional analysis for each recipe, including carbohydrate grams, which is critical if you have diabetes.

Dr. Cordain has a new cookbook being released in March, 2015. Does his 2011 collaboration with Nell Stephenson provide nutritional analysis (unlikely)?

Some books and authors for your consideration: Mark Sisson’s Primal Blueprint Cookbook, something from the Hartwigs, Robb Wolf, Sarah Fragoso’s Everyday Paleo,  Melissa Joulwan’s Well Fed, Diane Sanfilippo, Nom Nom Paleo by Tam and Fong, and Paul Jaminet.

Steve Parker, M.D.

 

Recipe: Bacon Bit Brussels Sprouts

Bacon Bit Brussels Sprouts

Bacon Bit Brussels Sprouts

A while back I posted a meal recipe for Bacon Brussels Sprouts to accompany Brian Burgers. To make it a little more convenient, I’ve substituted off-the-shelf real bacon bits instead of frying my own bacon. I traded olive oil for the bacon grease. The two versions taste very similar.

 

diabetic diet, paleobetic diet, low-carb diet

It took me 10 minutes of chopping to shred the sprouts

Ingredients:

1 lb (454 g) Brussels sprouts, raw, shredded (slice off and discard the bases first)

4 tbsp (60 ml) extra virgin olive oil

5 tbsp (75 ml or 35 g real bacon bits or crumbles (e.g., by Hormel or Oscar Mayer)

2 garlic cloves, minced (optional)

1/8 (0.6 ml) tsp salt

1/4 tsp (1.2 ml) ground black pepper

3 tbsp (45 ml) water

Instructions:

diabetic diet, paleobetic diet, low-carb diet

Steaming in progress

You’ll be steaming this in a pan with a lid. Put the garlic and olive oil in a pan and cook over medium-high heat for a few minutes to release the flavor of the garlic. Add the water to the pan and let it warm up for a half a minute or so on medium-high heat. Then add the shredded sprouts and cover with the lid. After a minute on this medium-high heat, turn it down to medium. The sprouts will have to cook for only 4–6 minutes. Every minute, shake the pan to keep contents from sticking. You might need to remove the lid and stir with a spoon once, but that lets ourtyour steam and may prolong cooking time. The sprouts are soft when done. Then remove from heat, add the bacon bits, salt, and pepper, then mix thoroughly.

When time allows, I’d like to experiment with this by leaving out the bacon and using various spices instead. Do you know what goes well with Brussels sprouts?

Number of Servings: 3 (1 cup or 240 ml each)

Nutritional Analysis per Serving:

71% fat

19% carbohydrate

10% protein

270 calories

14 g carbohydrate

6 g fiber

8 g digestible carbohydrate

328 mg sodium

646 mg potassium

Prominent feature: High in vitamin C (over 10o% of your RDA)

diabetic diet, low-carb diet, paleobetic diet

Brian burger and bacon Brussels sprouts

Recipe: Baked Glazed Salmon and Herbed Spaghetti Squash

This is a paleo-friendly modification of a meal in my Conquer Diabetes and Prediabetes book. It makes two servings.

Ingredients:

16 oz (450 g) salmon filets

4.5 garlic cloves

7 tsp (34.5 ml) extra virgin olive oil

1.5 fl oz (45 ml) white wine

4.5 tsp (22 ml) mustard

4 tbsp (60 ml) vinegar, either cider or white wine (balsamic vinegar would add 6 g of carbohydrate to each serving)

2 tsp (10 ml) honey

1.5 tbsp (15 ml) fresh chopped oregano (or 1 tsp (5 ml) of dried organo)

2 cups cooked spaghetti squash

2 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped

0.5 tsp (2.5 ml) salt

1/4 tsp (1.2 ml) black pepper, or to taste

Instructions:

Start on the herbed squash first since it may take 30 to 70 minutes to cook. Click  for instructions on cooking spaghetti squash unless you have some leftover in the fridge. To two cups of the cooked squash, add 4 tsp (20 ml) of the olive oil, all the fresh chopped parsley, a half clove of minced garlic, 1/3 tsp (1.6 ml) of the salt, and 1/8 tsp (0.6 ml) of black pepper, then mix thoroughly. The herbed squash is done. It could be difficult to time perfectly with the fish even if you have two ovens. But it’s tasty whether warm, room temperature, or cold. If you want it warm but it’s cooled down before the fish is ready, just microwave it briefly.

Onward to the fish. Preheat the oven to 400º F (200º C). Line a baking sheet or pan (8″ or 20 cm) with aluminum foil. Lightly salt and pepper the fish in the lined pan, with the skin side down.

Now the glaze. Sauté four cloves of minced garlic with 1 tbsp (15 ml) of olive oil in a small saucepan over medium heat for about three minutes, until it’s soft. Then add and mix the white wine, mustard, vinegar, honey, and 1/8 tsp (0.625 ml) of salt. Simmer uncovered over low or medium heat until slightly thickened, about there minutes. Remove glaze from heat and spoon about half of it into a separate container for later use.

Drizzle and brush the salmon in the pan with the glaze left in the saucepan. Sprinkle the oregano on tip.

Bake the fish in the oven for about 10–13 minutes, or until it flakes easily with a fork. Cooking time depends on your oven and thickness of the fish. Overcooking the fish will toughen it and dry it out. When done, use a turner to transfer the fish to plates, leaving the skin on the foil if able. Drizzle the glaze from the separate container over the filets with a spoon, or brush it on. Don’t use the unwashed brush you used earlier on the raw fish.

Servings: 2

Nutritional Analysis:

50% fat

13% carbohydrate

37% protein

600 calories

21 g carbohydrate

3 g fiber

18 g digestible carbohydrate

1,150 mg sodium

1,277 mg potassium

Prominent features: Rich in protein, B6, B12, niacin, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, and selenium