Category Archives: Recipes

Have You Considered the Lowly Rutabaga?

Jan over at The Low Carb Diabetic is getting me motivated to try a new vegetable: rutabaga.

Click the link below for Jan’s post and more photos and recipes.

“The picture above shows what Americans know as “rutabaga”. The Scottish call it “neeps” and serve it with haggis. I know it as swede, a fairly recent root vegetable, which is thought to have originated around the 17th century in Bohemia. In 1620 a Swiss botanist described the root vegetable, believed to be a hybrid of the cabbage and the turnip. By 1664 it was growing in England. A good source of vitamin.C, fibre, folate and potassium. It’s low in calories.”

Source: The Low Carb Diabetic: Swede / Rutabaga : How will you serve this low carb vegetable

Do you like rutabagas?

PS: If the copyright owner of the rutabaga photo wants me to take it down, contact Steve Parker, M.D., and it shall be done posthaste.

Recipe: Rosemary Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Onion

Final product without Parmesan sprinkles. That's sous vide chicken in the foreground.

Final product without Parmesan sprinkles. That’s sous vide chicken in the foreground.

At my request, my wife bought me a mess o’ Brussels sprouts, and I’ve been experimenting with recipes.

Sprouts sliced in half

Sprouts sliced in half

Ingredients this time are the sprouts, dried rosemary (i.e., not fresh although it’s a landscaping plant where I live), salt, pepper, extra virgin olive oil, fresh garlic, and diced onion.

FYI, rosemary is used as an ornamental landscaping plant in southern Arizona.

To promote release of flavor, I sautéed three garlic cloves and the rosemary in EVOO.

Releasing the flavors of garlic and rosemary over medium heat for perhaps 3 minutes

Releasing the flavors of garlic and rosemary over medium heat for perhaps 3 minutes

Then I sliced the sprouts in half along their long axis, to reduce cooking time. (Cut them so the leaves stay attached to the internal stalk.) You’d have to cut them in half before you eat ’em anyway.

I dumped all ingredients into a bowel and mixed thoroughly to ensure the sprouts were coated with oil.

Ready for the oven

Ready for the oven. I used about 3/4 cup of diced onion.

Everything except the bowl was transferred to a cooking sheet covered with aluminum foil (easy clean-up!), which I then popped into an oven pre-heated to 425°F. I cooked for 25 minutes. At around the 10 and 17-minute marks, I pulled the concoction out of the oven and stirred/flipped the ingredients to promote even cooking and browning. Your cooking time will vary from 17 to 25 minutes depending on your preferences. If you want some browning of the sprouts, you likely need to cook longer than 17 minutes. Unless your oven runs hotter than mine.

This is my favorite roasted Brussels sprouts recipe thus far. For an extra flavor zing, sprinkle with some Parmesan cheese just before eating. In the future, I may  top the ingredients with some other type of cheese a minute before the cooking is completed. Of course, if you eat pure paleo, you don’t eat cheese. Bacon bits are another tasty option.

Steve Parker, M.D.

Not "real" Parmesan from Italy. For example, this one contains cellulose "to prevent caking."

Not “real” Parmesan from the Parma region of Italy. For example, this one contains cellulose “to prevent caking.”

 

Recipe: Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Radishes

Roasted Radishes and Brussels Sprouts. Copyright Steve Parker MD

Roasted Radishes and Brussels Sprouts.
Photo Copyright Steve Parker MD

A year ago I ran across online praise for roasted radishes. I’m not a big fan of radishes, perhaps because they weren’t part of Parker family cuisine when I was growing up, but I finally gave them a try.

Beautiful, huh?

Beautiful, huh?

This won’t be as detailed as most of my recipes because I need to get into the hospital soon.

Raw Brussels Sprouts

Raw Brussels Sprouts

My basic ingredients were raw radishes and Brussels sprouts, diced onions, a bit of parsley (probably not needed), extra virgin olive oil, dried rosemary (i.e., not fresh), coarse salt, and pepper.

With the radishes, I cut off the little rootlet and green top, then cut them in half unless they were tiny radishes. Brussel sprouts take longer to cook, so I cut them in half, too. I put all the veggies  into a bowl, added just enough olive oil to coat them, sprinkled in some salt and pepper, then mixed with a spoon. Then I spread all that on a cooking sheet and popped it into an oven pre-heated to 425°F. (I covered my cooking sheet with aluminum foil to ease cleanup.)

All ingredients mixed in a bowl

All ingredients mixed in a bowl

I cooked in the oven for 17 minutes (15-20), using a turner to flip the veggies once or twice while cooking.

Ready for roasting

Ready for roasting

They were a little bland, so I topped off with Weber Roasted Garlic and Herb Seasoning. I enjoyed them and will do it again. Next time I may try coating with melted butter rather than olive oil. I felt very virtuous for eating my vegetables.

Steve Parker, M.D. 

PS: I ate half of this in one sitting. I refrigerated the rest and ate it about six hours later, after warming in the microwave. It was much more flavorful. If you’re one of those people who never eats leftovers…

…reconsider.

We Unboxed an Anova Precision Cooker

My wife got interested in the sous vide cooking method eight months ago. She gave her original Anova cooker away to someone and replaced it with another brand that broke and shocked her, literally. We just got our new Anova and did this unboxing video. I’m told that unboxing videos are “a thing.”

We’ve noticed in our corner of the universe that steaks are getting more expensive. Sous vide cooking allows us to use a cheaper and tougher cut of meat and it comes out very tender. The method often yields foods that are also more flavorful and juicier compared to other cooking styles.

Check Out DietDoctor’s Improved Low-Carb Recipe Collection

That's a guacamole deviled egg

That’s a guacamole deviled egg

They’ve always been good recipes—accompanied by all-important nutrient analysis—but they’re even better now. They’re not necessarily paleo-compliant, but many of them are.

From DietDoctor:

“Our low-carb recipe site is probably already the most popular one in the world, with over 100,000 daily pageviews, several hundred recipes and gorgeous images. Now we’re adding even more great functions.You can now change the number of servings for recipes – the ingredient amount will correspond to the number of servings – and you can now also choose between the US or the metric measurement systems for ingredients. All to make it simpler to use our recipes.

We’ve also added a function for members so that it is now possible to save your personal favorite recipes. To activate the latter feature you need to be logged in, so that your selections can be saved for later.”

Source: The World’s Best Low-Carb Recipes Just Got Better – Diet Doctor

Free “Paleo Asian Cookbook” From Alfie Mueeth

Author Alfie Mueeth tells me via email that his new recipe book will be available for free “tomorrow.” I don’t know what time zone Alfie’s in, so I don’t know when tomorrow starts and stops. Tomorrow for me is December 7.

The link Alfie gave me is https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01MPX9QNF?utm_content=buffer46c9c&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

or

http://track.mlsend3.com/link/c/YT01MTEzMDY3MzA5OTEyNTczMzAmYz1pMHQ0JmU9MTkyOCZiPTcyNTkxMjkzJmQ9cDJjNGYxYw==.56-8LPN0zt_VA7GZZp3yT19Dx9eAL27uPihfIUDVf_M

Why Not Try Gazpacho?

These are Hass or California avocados (the other common one in the U.S is the Florida avocado)

These are Hass or California avocados (the other common one in the U.S is the Florida avocado)

Here’s a recipe from The Low Carb Diabetic blog, one of my favorites. No carb count is provided but I bet it’s relatively low. If you know the carb count per serving, share in the comments. Calculate the carbs yourself at FitDay. Click the link below for the recipe. It’s paleo-diet compliant, if you don’t mind vinegar. A snippet:

“Gazpacho is a soup made of raw vegetables and served cold, usually with a tomato base, originating in the southern Spanish region of Andalucia, which some spell with a c, while others use an s! This soup can be great for a hot day when making a lunch that takes just a few minutes is exactly what you want. In our version of this Andalusian peasant dish we leave out the soaked bread and instead use a creamy avocado to give it substance.”

Source: The Low Carb Diabetic: Gazpacho – A taste of Andalucia

Recipe: Chicken Avocado Soup

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This blew my mind. Avocados in soup? Yeah, I was skeptical, too. But it works amazingly well. Since I provide the nutritional analysis below, you can easily work this into the Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet, Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet, Paleobetic Diet, or Advanced Mediterranean Diet.

Ingredients

1.5 lb (680 g) boneless skinless chicken breast

1 tbsp (15 ml) olive oil

1 cup (240 ml) chopped green onions

1/2 jalapeno pepper (or 1 or 2 peppers if you wish), seeded and minced (use the seeds, too, if you want it very spicy hot)

2 roma tomatoes (5 oz or 140 g), seeded and diced

2 garlic cloves, minced

60 oz (1,700 g) low-sodium chicken broth

salt and pepper to taste (nutritional analysis below assumes no salt added)

1/2 tsp (2.5 ml) ground cumin

1/3 cup (80 ml) chopped cilantro

3 tbsp (45 ml) fresh lime juice (2 limes should be enough)

3 medium California avocados, peeled, seeded, and cubed

Instructions

Heat up the olive oil in a large pot over medium heat, then add the green onions and jalapeño; sauté until tender (1–2 minutes) then add the garlic and cook another 30 seconds or so. Next into the pot goes the chicken broth, cumin, tomatoes, chicken breasts, and optional salt and pepper. If adding salt, I’d wait until just before serving: taste it and then decide if it needs salt. Bring to a boil with high heat, then reduce heat but keep it boiling, covering with a lid while the chicken cooks through-out. Cooking time depends on thickness of the breasts and may be 15 to 45 minutes. When done, it should be easy to shred with a fork. Reduce heat to low or warm then remove the chicken breasts and allow them to cool for 5–10 minutes. When cool enough, shred the chicken with your fingers and return it to the pot. Add the cilantro. Ladle 1.5 cups (355 ml) into a bowl, add one fifth or sixth of the avocado cubes (half of an avocado) and the juice of 1/4 to 1/2 lime. Enjoy!

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Serving size: 1.5 cup of soup plus 1/2 of an avocado

Servings per Batch: 5

Advanced Mediterranean Diet boxes: 1 veggie, 1 fat, 1 protein

Nutritional Analysis per Serving:

43 % fat

13 % carbohydrate

44 % protein

350 calories

12 g carbohydrate

8 g fiber

4 g digestible carb

638 mg sodium

1,180 mg potassium

Prominent features: Rich in protein, vitamin B6, vitamin C, niacin, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, selenium; plus a fair amount of fiber

PS: If you’re not eating pure paleo, you can fancy this up just before serving by adding a couple large triangular corn tortilla chips (broken into a few bits) or half of a 6-inch (15 cm) corn tortilla (first, microwave for 20 seconds, then break into chunks). Both items each add 5 g of digestible carbohydrate; the tortilla chip option adds 60 calories and the corn tortilla adds 25 calories. Shredded cheese might be a nice topper, too.

 

A New Cookbook: Does “Primal” Now Always Refer to Mark Sisson’s Version of the Paleo Diet?

Carolyn at All Day I Dream About Food brought my attention to a new cookbook called The Primal Low-Carb Kitchen, by Kyndra Holley.

The book’s detail page at Amazon.com doesn’t define “primal.”

When I see the word “primal,” I think of Mark Sisson’s version of the paleo diet. I’m no expert on Mark’s diet, but off the top of my head I know it includes dairy products. Also, one of the Amazon reviews of The Primal Low-Carb Kitchen mentions use of green beans, a staple in low-carb diets but not considered “paleo” by many because they’re legumes. So a paleo purist will find some recipes they won’t use.

You can’t please everybody. A reviewer of my Paleobetic Diet (barebones version) didn’t like it because she was expecting a raw-foods diet and also didn’t appreciate my allowance of canned tuna. (BTW, if you want that barebones version, you might grab it now because I’m thinking about killing it.)

Anyway…

I bring this to your attention mainly for the book’s inclusion of basic nutritional analysis like carb counts and calories. That’s important if you have diabetes, prediabetes, or are overweight. I wish more paleo diet cookbooks provided the same info.

If I’m wrong about Kyndra’s book being paleo-friendly, let me know.

Steve Parker, M.D.

Time-Saving Tip: Microwave Your Spaghetti Squash

The pale yellow half-squash is cooked. The meaty red sauce is low-carb.

Both of these weighed about 4 pounds (1.8 kg). The pale yellow half-squash is cooked. The meaty red sauce is low-carb.

My wife found this new spaghetti squash cooking method—new to us at least—on a sticker attached to a squash. We tried it and the finished product is the same as if done in the traditional oven baking way. The whole process just takes 15 minutes. Here it is:

Hope you can read it

Hope you can read it

A different squash had a different stuck-on cooking method that involved both microwaving AND oven baking. Why make it so complicated?

It takes no skill at all to make it look like spaghetti pasta

It takes no skill at all to make it look like spaghetti pasta

 

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In the northern hemisphere, the spaghetti squash season is autumn and winter. Purchasing in spring and summer may be iffy. We tried one out of season and it was inedible. In case you’re eating paleo-style, the following recipes are paleo-diet-compliant.

Spaghetti Squash Recipes

Low-Carb Spaghetti Sauce

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