Category Archives: Quote of the Day

QOTD: Michael Nehls on Ancestral Lifestyle

Lean and muscular

Which is lean and muscular?

“A lifestyle that encompasses 12+ hours intermittent fasting overnight, a nutrient-rich, low-glycemic diet and regular physical exercise almost inevitably leads to a body composition close to that of our foraging ancestors: lean and muscular. Unfortunately, the behavioural trend goes in the other direction, where obesity and “age-related” muscle loss is becoming a major health issue.”

Source: Unified theory of Alzheimer’s disease (UTAD): implications for prevention and curative therapy

QOTD: E.E. Blaak on Optimal Diet

Grain-based high-carb Neolithic food

Grain-based high-carb Neolithic food

Overall, energy restriction is the primary factor producing weight loss, and it is increasingly understood that distinct macronutrients may vary in energy yield and effects on satiety, also based on individuals’ phenotype and genotype. Although an overall healthy diet, either Mediterranean or a low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate diet may be effective in diabetes and cardiovascular prevention, insight is increasing that dietary prevention or treatment may require more personalized approaches to become most effective.

     —E.E. Blaak, in a review of effects of dietary carbohydrate in body weight control, glucose homeostasis and cardiovascular risk

In plain English, Blaak is saying:

  • weight loss depends on calorie restriction
  • proteins, fats, and carbs provide different amounts of energy and have different effects on hunger
  • your response to proteins, fats, and carbs depends on your genes and how you look
  • the healthiest diet for you probably isn’t the best for everyone else

Steve Parker, M.D.

QOTD: Too Busy to Exercise?

What fits your busy schedule better, exercising 30 minutes a day or being dead 24 hours a day?

Randy Glasbergen in a 2008 cartoon

QOTD: Don’t Let Gravity Get You Down

Average age of study subjects was 71

A good resistance training program will strengthen her bones, improve her balance, and prevent that hip fracture 60 years from now

Adult life is a battle against gravity. Weight training postpones your inevitable defeat.

—Steve Parker, M.D.

QOTD: Walter Voegtlin on Intellectual Independence

If this book must be dedicated to someone, it should be to the occasional man, woman, or child who still can resist the specious authority of food merchants, their lavish advertisements and spectacular television commercials, and retain sufficient intellectual independence to think for themselves.

—Walter L. Voegtlin, M.D., F.A.C.P., in The Stone Age Diet (1975)

QOTD: J. Stanton on Weight Loss and Exercise

Let me be clear. Exercise is not important because it burns calories! Exercise without calorie restriction is a remarkably ineffective weight loss intervention, because it usually makes us hungry enough to replace the calories we burn. Exercise is important because it restores your ability to oxidize fat—both when fasting and after meals. And we can tie this in with mitochondrial dysfunction by noting that exercise is proven to increase mitochondrial volume.

J. Stanton

QOTD: Dobzhansky on Evolution

Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution.

 

QOTD: Rippetoe on the Best Single Exercise

The below-parallel squat is the best exercise in the entire catalog for whole-body strength, power, balance, coordination, bone density, joint integrity, and mental toughness — good things to develop if you don’t have them.

—Mark Rippetoe

QOTD: Cicero on Overeating

“ We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink. ”

Cicero

Advice to New Muscleheads from Lou Schuler

Steve Parker MD, Advanced Mediterranean Diet, Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet

Not me or Mr. Schuler

I was glad to see that four of my basic exercises were listed by Schuler as foundational: squat, deadlift, pushup, and row. A little more from him:

Every good training program is based on bedrock principles like progressive overload. You give your body a stimulus. You repeat the stimulus an optimal number of times. And then you give your body the opportunity to recover from it. Every good lifter eventually learns how to apply the principles in a way that works for him or her, but it always starts with the basics: learn the movements, apply the movements, build on the movements.

Every bad training program ignores these fundamentals, but it ignores them in a unique way. Too much stimulus with too little recovery. Too little stimulus with too much recovery. Poor exercise selection for the individual’s abilities and goals.

Read the whole thing.

 

h/t Yoni Freedhoff, M.D.