Tag Archives: liraglutide

Are These Two Diabetes Drugs Better Than the Others?

Better living through chemistry

Empagliflozin is a pill. Liraglutide is a once-daily subcutaneous injection.

The two drugs in question are empagliflozin (aka Jardiance) and liraglutide (aka Victoza). Both are used to treat type 2 diabetes, not type 1.

A major problem we have with most diabetes drugs is that while they do lower blood sugars, we don’t have much evidence on whether they actually prolong life and prevent bad outcomes like heart attacks, strokes, cancer, blindness, kidney failure, amputations, and serious infections.

It gets even more complicated. For instance, a given drug may eventually be proven to prolong life by a year via prevention of death from heart disease, while at the same time increasing the risk of spending that last year bedridden from a stroke.

It’s extremely difficult and costly to suss out these issues. It requires large clinical trials wherein half of the PWDs (people with diabetes) are treated with a particular drug, and the other half are treated with “standard therapy.” Five or 10 years later you compare clinical endpoints between the two groups. A couple studies have done this recently.

A blogger I follow, Larry Husten, wrote the following:

But it was the secondary goal of these trials that led to the transformation of the field. Baked into the trial design was the provision that if they were able to establish noninferiority then the trial investigators were permitted to test for superiority. The second phase began when Empa-Reg became the first trial to convincingly show a clear benefit, including a reduction in cardiovascular death and a reduction in hospitalization for heart failure. with empagliflozin (Jardiance, Merck). Then, more recently, the LEADER trial showed a significant reduction in cardiovascular events with liraglutide (Victoza, Novo Nordisk). In both trials nearly all the patients had significant established cardiovascular disease—precisely the population that cardiologists are likely to see.

Click the embedded links above for more details. Even better, read the original research reports if you have the time and knowledge. I support my family with a full-time job taking care of patients, so it will be a while (if ever) before I can dig into this further. (When my book sales make me independently wealthy, I’ll have more time for this!)

diabetic diet, low-carb Mediterranean Diet, low-carb, Conquer Diabetes and Prediabetes

Analyzing clinical reports requires a good grasp of logic, statistics, and basic science

Are the LEADER and Empa-Reg trials valid? Yeah, maybe. In an ideal world, other investigators would try to replicate the results with additional clinical trials. Are the published results free of fraud and bias? I don’t know.

Because we don’t know the long-term effects of many of our diabetes drugs, I favor doing as much as possible to control blood sugars with diet, exercise, and weight management.

Stay tuned for future developments.

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: Just because one drug in a class of drugs reduces bad clinical outcomes, it doesn’t mean all drugs in the class do.

PPS: If it’s hard for you to pronounce empagliflozin and liraglutide, some of my books don’t even have them.

Diabetes Drug Liraglutide Going Mainstream, for Weight Loss

Just before Christmas last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new weight-loss drug: Saxenda. It’s the same drug—liraglutide or Victoza—they approved for treatment of diabetes in 2010.

Click for my brief review of the drug class for diabetics.

Click for the CBS News report on Saxenda. A snippet:

One clinical trial that involved patients without diabetes found that patients taking Saxenda had an average weight loss of 4.5 percent after one year. Of the people treated with the drug, 62 percent lost at least 5 percent of their body weight. Meanwhile, only 34 percent of those given an inactive placebo had the same result.

Another clinical trial that included patients with type 2 diabetes found that patients had an average weight loss of almost 4 percent after one year. Of those given Saxenda, 49 percent lost at least 5 percent of their body weight, compared to 16 percent of those who were given a placebo treatment.

Click for the FDA’s press release.

Oh, by the way. You have to inject it daily under the skin (subcutaneous). And if you were hoping for a shortcut to weight loss, this ain’t it. You’re still supposed to follow a reduced-calorie diet and exercise regularly.

I’d try the Paleobetic Diet first if I had diabetes. Lose excess weight and control blood sugars.

Steve Parker, M.D.

PS: Full prescribing information.