Tag Archives: low-carb

Recipe: Steak, Avocado, Olives and Tomato

Paleobetic diet

I ate mine for breakfast. Who needs bagels, cereal, and donuts?

This was super-easy to put together because I used leftover steak. But I’ll assume you’re cooking your steak fresh. We bought ours as thinly sliced round steak, about a 1/4-inch thick (0.6 cm). Some places might refer to this as a “minute steak” because it cooks so quickly. Minute steak also refers to a piece of beef, usually the round, that’s been pounded flat, about a 1/4-inch thick. Even if you start with raw meat, you can prepare today’s recipe in 10 minutes.

Paleobetic diet

It tastes as good as it looks

Ingredients:

4 oz (113 g) cooked thin round steak (start with 5 oz raw)

1 California (Hass) avocado, standard size (4.5 oz or 127 g), peeled, pitted, and chunked

14 black olives, pitted, medium size (Purist alert: probably highly processed)

1 tomato, medium-size (medium size or 2.5-inch diameter (6,4 cm), or a large roma tomato), cut into wedges

Salt and pepper to taste, or use commercial steak seasoning such as Montreal Steak Seasoning by McCormick (a favorite at the Parker Compound)

Instructions:

Sprinkle your steak with seasoning then cook over medium or medium-high heat in a skillet, about a minute on each side. Or heat your leftover steak in the microwave. If you overcook, it will be tough.

Place all ingredients artfully on a plate and enjoy.

Servings: 1

Nutritional Analysis (via Fitday):

60% fat

12% carbohydrate

28% protein

600 calories

20 g carbohydrate

12 g fiber

8 g digestible carbohydrate

587 mg sodium

1530 mg potassium

Prominent features: Lots of protein, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, copper, iron, niacin, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, selenium, and zinc

Recipe: Turkey Tomato Bowl + Macadamia Nuts

paleobetic diet, low-carb

This Turkey Tomato Bowl fits criteria for the Paleobetic Diet

This is what I did with some of our leftover Thanksgiving turkey. If you don’t have leftover turkey, I bet leftover chicken or steak would be  fine substitutes. Heck, I’m tempted to try it with salmon or canned tuna or chicken. In addition to the flavor, what I like about this meal is that it’s crazy quick.

Ingredients:

6 oz (170 g) cooked turkey chunks, light meat (or 8 oz (225 g) if you’re starting raw and planning to cook it)

5 oz (140 g) raw tomato (2 small roma tomatoes, for example), cut into chunks

2 tbsp (30 ml) balsamic vinaigrette

black pepper to taste

1 oz (30 g) roasted macadamia nuts

paleobetic diet, low-carb, diabetes, diabetic diet, paleo diet

These roma tomatoes were amazingly flavorful for late Fall in the northern hemisphere. Before cooking, my wife injected the bird with olive oil, massaged periodically over 30 minutes, then popped it in the oven.

Instructions:

Toss the turkey and tomato chunks in a bowl, splash on the vinaigrette, then microwave for 60-80 seconds. Pepper as desired. Drink the leftover juice right out of the bowl. Enjoy with macadamia nuts for dessert and you’ve got a full meal.

Discussion:

paleobetic diet, low-carb, diabetes, diabetic diet

Grok wouldn’t have access to this

I was lazy when I made this so I just used a commercial salad dressing rather than making my own vinaigrette. Wish-Bone Balsamic Vinaigrette Dressing “with extra virgin olive oil.” Here are the top ingredients, in order: water, balsamic vinegar, soybean oil and extra virgin olive oil (sic), sugar, salt, spices, etc. So the oil could have been soybean oil (from a legume—the horror!!!) with one drop of EVOO for all I know. Olive oil is a rich source of monounsaturated fatty acid, so you might be able to calculate how much EVOO was in the dressing if I tell you there were five grams of fat per two tbsp (30 ml) serving, of which 1.5 grams were monounsaturated. That serving also has three grams of carbohydrate (all sugar) and only 60 calories. Right there on the bottle is says gluten-free and “no high fructose corn syrup.” I bet it had HFCS in it three years ago and there would be no mention of the trendy “gluten-free.”

I don’t know any home cooks who add water to vinaigrettes. They are essentially oil and vinegar (in a ratio of 3:1) and spices. The ones I make have quite a bit more than 60 calories per two tbsp (30 ml); more like 220 cals. All of the oils you would use have about 120 calories per tbsp all from fat. If you make this recipe with home-made vinaigrette, add 150 calories to the nutritional analysis below. It won’t affect the carb count.

Note that of the common vinegars, balsamic has the most carbohydrates—some vinegars have zero. If you use typical amounts of balsamic vinaigrette, you shouldn’t need to worry about the carbohydrates unless perhaps you’re on a strict ketogenic diet and limited to 20-30 grams of carb daily.

Servings: 1

Nutritional Analysis:

58% fat

7% carbohydrate

35% protein

620 calories

11.5 g carbohydrate

3.7 g fiber

8 g digestible carbohydrate

743 mg sodium

877 mg potassium

Prominent features: High in protein, vitamin B6, iron, manganese, niacin, phosphorus, selenium, and zinc.

paleobetic diet, low-carb, diabetic diet, paleo diet

Bonus pic! A new horse at the Parker Compound. He’s an old-style Morgan.

Recipe: Waldorfian Salad

paleobetic diet, low-carb diet

One cup of Waldorfian salad. I doubled the cinnamon in this batch, so yours won’t look quite like this.

Today’s meal is inspired by the classic Waldorf salad, made famous by New York’s Waldorf Hotel over a century ago. The hotel today is called the Waldorf-Astoria.

The primary ingredients are apples, walnuts, and celery.

The original salad was made with mayonnaise, which I’m leaving out since I don’t yet have a paleo-compliant formula. They’re out there, however. Do you have a favorite?

paleobetic diet

Good source of omega-3 fatty acids

Instead of mayonnaise, we use a dressing—a vinaigrette—made with walnut oil. Walnut oil is attractive in part because it is rich in omega-3 fatty acids: 1.77 grams per tbsp (15 ml). Compared with Paleolithic diets, modern Western diets are too low in omega-3s and too high in omega-6s. You can use your left-over walnut oil the way you’d use olive oil.

paleobetic diet, low-carb diet, ketogenic diet

I made my dressing in this BPA-laden plastic container

In composing the Paleobetic Diet, my biggest challenge is breakfast. I’m fine eating eggs almost daily, but that may not be your cup ‘o tea. Most of us in America are accustomed to grain-based options like cold cereal, porridge, bagels, donuts, pancakes, granola, and toast. Plus yogurt. Those aren’t paleo, and they have too many carbohydrates for many diabetics. I came up with Waldorfian salad as a low-carb paleo-style breakfast, reminiscent of Brian’s Berry Breakfast.

This recipe makes two large servings of 2 cups (480 ml) each. Small or sedentary folks may well be satisfied with a 1- or 1.5-cup serving.

paleobetic diet, low-carb diet, ketogenic diet

Apples are the primary source of carbohydrates in this recipe.

Ingredients:

2 apples, raw, medium size, skin on, diced (I used Red Delicious; consider Granny Smith, Fuji, or Gala)

3 celery stalks, 8-inches long (20 cm), diced

1 cup (240 ml) walnuts, broken by hand into small chunks (Option for ? more flavor: toast in a skillet over medium-high heat for 7-10 minutes or in oven (350 F or 175 C) on baking sheet for 10 minutes

1/4 tsp (1.2 ml) black pepper, ground

1/4 tsp (1.2 ml) salt

1.5 tbsp (22 ml) walnut oil

1 tbsp (15 ml) cider vinegar

1/2 tsp (2.5 ml) cinnamon

1/4 tsp (1.2 ml) nutmeg

Instructions:

First make a dressing with the bottom six ingredients. I put mine in a small container with a lid, then shook vigorously. Or you can put them in a small bowel and whisk them.

paleobetic diet, low-carb diet, ketogenic diet

Walnut pieces

Place the walnuts, apples and celery in a bowel, add the dressing and toss thoroughly. You’re done.

Serve as is, or chill first in the refrigerator. Maybe it was my imagination, but I thought it tasted better after it sat on the counter for 10 minutes. Consider serving on a bed of lettuce (1-2 oz), but if you do, increase your digestible carb count by 1-2 grams.

If you want more calories or protein than this recipe provides, chicken or steak should go well with Waldorfian salad and won’t increase your carb grams.

Number of Servings: 2 (2 cups each)

Nutritional Analysis:

73% fat

21% carbohydrate

6% protein

500 calories

27.5 g carbohydrate

7.6 g fiber

20 g digestible carbohydrate

341 mg sodium

529 mg potassium

Prominent features: High in copper and manganese, low in sodium. This is vegetarian (so much for the paleo diet being meat-centric). On a 2,000 calorie diet, this provides only 15% of the Recommended Dietary Allowance for protein, so you’ll want to eat more protein at some point during the day.

Consider Low-Carb Eating Instead of Drugs for Your GERD

How about this one?

It’s easier to pop a pill than change your diet, especially if someone else is paying for the pills

Dr. Michael Eades has a recent post on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and it’s treatment with carbohydrate-restricted eating versus drugs. A quote:

Most people who have GERD, have it for the long term. It’s not something that comes and goes. So these folks go on GERD therapy for the long term, and the most prescribed medications for long-term GERD treatment are PPIs [proton pump inhibitors], which, you now know, keep stomach acid neutralized for the long term, and, as you might imagine, creates a host of problems.

The scientific literature has shown long-term PPI therapy to be related to the following conditions:

  • Anemia
  • Pneumonia
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency
  • Impaired calcium absorption
  • Impaired magnesium absorption
  • Increased rate fractures, especially hip, wrist and spine
  • Osteopenia [thin brittle bones]
  • Rebound effect of extra-heavy gastric acid secretion
  • Heart attacks

Read the rest if you or someone you love has GERD. Acid-reducing Nexium is the second most-prescribed drug (by sales) in the U.S. We have stomach acid for a reason. It’s not nice to fool Mother Nature eliminating it.

Here’s a scientific report supporting Dr. Eades’ clinical experience that carbohydrate restriction helps with GERD. Carbs were reduced to 20 grams a day.

Steve Parker, M.D.

Recipe: BLT Avocado Wraps and Pecans

paleobetic diet, paleo diet for diabetics

Ready to roll up and eat

BLT = bacon, lettuce, and tomato.

As I’ve written before, bacon isn’t a pure paleo food. Cavemen didn’t eat it. It’s too highly processed. You could make your own if you want. But bacon is convenient and no doubt better for you—at least if you have diabetes—than many of our traditional breakfast foods like cereal with milk, pancakes, instant oatmeal, bagels, or donuts. Those could shoot your blood sugar up to the moon.

Some studies link processed meats with cardiovascular disease and cancer, other studies don’t. If you want to be cautious with your health, don’t go hog-wild with bacon or other processed meats like hot dogs, bologna, and liverwurst.

Avocados come in hundreds of varieties. In the U.S., we mainly have California avocados (aka Hass) and Florida avocados. Californians are by far the market leader. They reign at the Parker Compound.

paleobetic diet

California or Hass avocado

paleobetic diet, paleo diet for diabetes

Florida avocado

California avocados are smaller dark green lumpy-skinned ones. Florida avocados are larger, smoother-skinned, and lighter green. Monica Reinagel has an article comparing the two, with notes on ripening and storage.

Oh, and by the way, avocados are fruits, not vegetables. But you knew that, you smartie.

Ingredients:

1 California (Hass) avocado, raw, medium size (about 4 x 2.5 inches or 10 x 6 cm), peeled and seeded, cut into long strips

6 bacon strips, medium thickness

4 oz (115 g) lettuce (e.g., iceberg, romaine, bibb, or broad-leaf lettuce you prefer)

4 oz (115 g) tomato, raw (this is about one-and-a half roma tomatoes or one medium regular tomato), cut into long strips

1 oz (30 g) pecans (option: substitute your favorite tree nut except for cashews—too many carbs)

Instructions:

Fry your bacon in a skillet over medium to medium-high heat. Next you’re gong to build two wraps. Lay out about two oz (  g) of lettuce and load it with three bacon strips, half your tomato, and half your avocado. Fold or wrap lettuce edges together and enjoy. Repeat with remaining ingredients. The pecans are for dessert.

paleobetic diet, paleo diet for diabetes

Our vicious guard dogs waiting for bacon

Number of Servings: 1 (that’s 2 wraps plus nuts)

Nutritional Analysis:

74% fat

12% carbohydrate

14% protein

720 calories

24 g carbohydrate

15 g fiber

9 g digestible carbohydrate

1137 mg sodium

1507 mg potassium

Prominent features: Good source of fiber, sodium, protein, vitamin B6, niacin, thiamine, pantothenic acid, copper, manganese, phosphorus, and selenium.

Recipe: Naked Chicken Fajitas with Walnuts and Pear

paleobetic diet

It looks more appealing if you use green and red bell peppers

My earliest recollection of fajitas is from Austin, Texas, in 1981. I had just moved there from Oklahoma City to start my internship and residency in Internal Medicine. Back then fajitas were made with skirt steak, the diaphragm of a cow or steer. It was considered a cheap low-quality cut of meat. You can also make fajitas with chicken. The contents of a fajita are wrapped in a tortilla usually made with flour. Since we’re a paleo crowd, we’ll skip the tortilla. Use lettuce as a wrapper if you wish.

I wonder if the El Azteca Restaurant is still in business. Best Mexican food I ever had. I think it was on 6th Street or so, about 3/4 mile east of I-35. Good times.

By the way, the j in fajita is pronounced “h.” Accent on second syllable. “Fuh-HEET-uh.”

Today we’re using chicken and making four servings

paleobetic diet, paleo diet for diabetics

Pre-cut chicken breasts and sweet mini-peppers

Ingredients:

1 lb (454 kg) chicken breast, raw, boneless and skinless, cut in strips about 1/4-inch wide (you can often buy it this way)

7 oz onion, raw, cut in long crescent shapes about a 1/4-inch wide (0.6 cm)

6 oz (170 g) bell pepper, raw, cut in long strips roughly a 1/4-inch wide (these are also called sweet peppers; a combination of the red and green ones is eye-pleasing)

2 tbsp (30 ml) olive oil

5 or 6 oz (155 g) tomato, raw, cut in long strips

1 tsp (5 ml) salt

1/2 tsp (2.5 ml) pepper

1/2 tsp (2.5 ml) chili powder

1 tsp (5 ml) parsley flakes

1/2 tsp (2.5 ml) oregano leaves

1 pinch of cumin

1/2 tsp (2.5 ml) paprika

(Optional: You could replace all these spices with a 1-oz (28 g) pack of Lawry’s Chicken Fajitas Spices & Seasoning. The sodium and potassium values below would be different.)

1/3 cup (80 ml) water

16 oz (454 g) lettuce (e.g., iceberg, romaine, or bibb)

4 oz (113 g) walnuts

4 pears, small (about 1/3 lb or 150 g each))

Instructions:

Add the onions, peppers, and 1 tbsp (15 ml)  olive oil to a 12-inch (30 cm) skillet and cook at medium-high heat until tender, stirring occasionally. This’ll take about 10 minutes. Set the skillet contents aside.

paleobetic diet, paleo diet for diabetes

This is double the recipe amount since there are six humanoids in my household

paleobetic diet, paleo diet for diabetics

The vegetables reduce volume by half while cooking

In the same pan, add 1 tbsp (15 ml) olive oil and the chicken and cook at medium to medium-high heat, stirring frequently, until chicken is thoroughly cooked. For me, this cooked quicker than the vegetables. But don’t overcook or the chicken will get tough. Then add the water and all the spices. Bring to a boil while stirring occasionally, then simmer on low heat a few minutes. This is your fajita filling.

My original plan was to make “fajita wraps,” wrapping the cooked fajitas into a large leaf of iceberg lettuce. This was pretty messy, especially since I love the sauce in the bottom of the pan. I tried two leafs as a base: still messy. Finally I just made a bed of lettuce (4 oz) and loaded the fajita concoction right on top. Mess gone. Try a different lettuce? Skip the lettuce entirely and you can reduce digestible carb count in each serving by 2 grams.

Enjoy the walnuts and pear with your meal.

Leftovers taste just as good as fresh-cooked, perhaps even better.

I have another fajita recipe using skirt steak marinated in commercial Zesty Italian Dressing in the refrigerator overnight or for at least four hours. Grill it over coals outside. Yum! I don’t recall whether I added lemon juice to the marinade or squirted it on the meat just before serving. You would just cook the onions and peppers on a pan on the stove as above, with salt and pepper to taste. Garnish with a margarita and I’ll make you an honorary Texan.

Number of servings: 4

Serving size: A cup (240 ml) of the fajita mixture, 4 oz (113 g) lettuce, 1 oz (28 g) walnuts, 1 small pear. One cup makes two lettuce wraps.

Nutritional Analysis Per Serving:

48% fat

26% carbohydrate

26% protein

Calories: 514

37 g carbohydrate

10 g fiber

27 g digestible carbohydrate (25 g if you skip the lettuce)

928 mg sodium

904 mg potassium

Prominent features: Rich in protein, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, vitamin C,copper, iron, manganese, niacin, phosphorus, and selenium.

paleobetic diet

Another view, prior to rolling it up (wrapping)

Plain Ol’ Bacon, Eggs, and Honeydew, and How To Put Out a Grease Fire

Is bacon paleo-compliant? Not really. It’s too heavily processed. Including it in a Stone Age diet is a nod to convenience and variety.

Bacon, eggs, black coffee, and Cholula hot sauce. A caveman wouldn't recognized any of this except for eggs.

Bacon, eggs, black coffee, and Cholula hot sauce. A caveman wouldn’t recognized any of this except for eggs.

If you follow nutrition science literature, you’ll see periodic references to “processed meats” like bacon contributing to increased risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, or premature death. I think the associations are pretty weak. I don’t want to debate it right now. Health-conscious cautious people aren’t going to go hog-wild on processed meats. I don’t. We may never have a definitive science-based resolution of the issue.

If you want to control the degree of processing in your bacon, make your own. The recipe at the link includes pink salt (sodium nitrite), maple syrup, and dark brown sugar. Many other recipes are available, some of which could be more paleo-compliant. My understanding is that sodium nitrite is a preservative and gives bacon meat that pink color. Does it contribute to flavor? If you’re not storing your bacon for a long time, you may not need the pink salt.

In any case, I thoroughly enjoyed three strips of bacon with my eggs yesterday. Mine was the Kirkland brand from Costco was $3.80/pound (USD). Two slices provide 80 calories (uncooked) and zero grams of carb although, if I recall correctly, it was honey-cured bacon.

Ingredients:

3 large eggs

3 strips of bacon, standard thin slices

Salt and pepper to taste

1/2 cup raw honeydew melon, cubed

Instructions:

Fry the bacon over medium or medium-high heat. If there’s too much grease leftover in the pan after cooking, poor out what you don’t want, for later use or drizzle over your dog’s dry kibble food. Leave a little grease in the pan so your eggs don’t stick. Then fry your eggs over medium heat. Enjoy with raw honeydew, which will cleanse your palate after eating bacon.

You can pay a lot more than $3.80 a pound for bacon

You can pay a lot more than $3.80 a pound for bacon

Servings: One

Nutritional Analysis per Serving: (from FitDay.com)

63 % fat

10 % carbohydrate

26 % protein

319 calories

9 carb grams

1 fiber grams

8 digestible carb grams

845 mg sodium

423 mg potassium

Prominent features: high in B12, riboflavin, selenium, protein, pantothenic acid, and phosphorus. Although this is low in calories, it’s adequately satiating because of the rich protein and fat content. The calorie count will be higher by 50 if you eat all the bacon grease.

By the way, I didn’t start a grease fire when cooking this. But I thought about it. After I poured excess grease out of my pan, some of it dribbled onto the outside of the pan. If I had put that pan back on a gas stove to cook my eggs, would that outside grease have caught fire and crept up into the pan?

How do you put out a grease fire? I knew water wouldn’t do the trick; my first thought was pour salt on it. That’s wrong! About.com says to simply smother it by putting a metal lid on the pan and turn off the heat. If you can’t find the fitted lid, use a cookie sheet. Fire won’t burn without a supply of oxygen. You could pour baking soda on the fire, but it takes a lot. Wikihow has more info on putting out a grease fire, mentioning a dry chemical fire extinguisher as a last resort if you’re going to handle the fire yourself. Think safety first.

Grease fire? Put a lid on it and turn off heat. If that fails, try a LOT of baking soda. Or fire extinguisher.

Grease fire? Put a lid on it and turn off heat. If that fails, try a LOT of baking soda. Or fire extinguisher.

Has Carbohydrate-Restricted Eating Been Studied in Type 1 Diabetes?

Sweden has lots of blondes

Sweden has lots of blondes

Yes, there are few published scientific reports. Let’s take a close look at one today. (See the references below for more.)

In the introduction to the study at hand, the authors note:

The estimation of the amount of carbohydrates in a meal has an error rate of 50%. The insulin absorption may vary by up to 30%. It is therefor virtually impossible to match carbohydrates and insulin which leads to unpredictable blood glucose levels after meals. By reducing the carbohydrates and insulin doses the size of the blood glucose fluctuations can be minimized. The risk of hypoglycemia is therefore minimized as well. Around-the-clock euglycemia [normal blood sugar] was seen with 40 g carbohydrates in a group of people with type 1 diabetes [reference #2 below].

The immediate resulting stable, near-normal blood glucose levels allow individuals to predict after-meal glucose levels with great accuracy.

For individuals with type 1 diabetes one year audit/evaluation of group education in this regimen has shown that the short-time lowering of mean hemoglobin A1c by 1 percentage unit and the reduction in mean rate of symptomatic hypoglycemia by 82% was maintained [reference #3].

***

There is no evidence for the use of the widely recommended high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet in type 1 diabetes.

Study Set-Up

Swedish investigators educated study participants on carbohydrate-restricted eating from 2004 to 2006 [reference #1]. They recently audited their medical records for results accumulated over four years. At the outset, participants were given 24 hours of instruction over four weeks. My sense is that they all attended the same diabetes clinic. The subjects’ mean age was 52 years and they had diabetes for an average of 24 years. Seven had gastroparesis. Fourteen used insulin pumps. Of the 48 study subjects, 31 were women, 17 were men. The diet regimen restricted carbohydrates to a maximum of 75 grams a day, mainly by reducing starchy food.

Results

As measured three months after starting the diet, HDL-cholesterol rose and triglycerides fell to a clinically significant degree (p<0.05). Average weight fell by 2.7 kg (5.9 lb); average baseline weight was 77.6 kg (171 lb). Hemoglobin A1c fell from 7.6 to 6.3% (Mono-S method).

As measured one year after start, meal-time insulin (rapid-acting, I assume) fell from 23 to 13 units per day. Long-acting insulin was little changed at around 19 units daily.

By two years into the study, half the participants had stopped adhering to the diet. The remainder were adherent (13 folks) or partly adherent (10). We don’t know what the non-adherents were eating.

Four years out, the adherent group had hemoglobin A1c of 6.0%, and the partly adherents were at 6.9% (p<0.001 for both). The non-adherent group had returned to their baseline HgbA1c (7.5%). Remember, at baseline the average HgbA1c for the group was 7.6%.

The authors don’t say how many participants were still adherent after four years. From Figure 2, adherence seems to have been assessed at 60 months: 8 of the 13 adherent folks were still adherent, and 5 of the 10 partly adherent were still in the game. So, of 48 initial subjects, only 13 were still low-carbing after five years later. By five years out, half of all subjects seem to have been lost to follow-up. So the drop-out rate for low-carbers isn’t as bad as it looks at first blush.

Conclusion

The authors write:

An educational program involving a low-carbohydrate diet and correspondingly reduced insulin doses for informed individuals with type 1 diabetes gives acceptable adherence after 4 years. One in two people attending the education achieves a long-term significant HbA1c reduction.

They estimate that this low-carb diet “may be an option for 10-20% of the patients with type 1 diabetes.” Only 17% of their current diabetes clinic population is interested in this low-carb diet. They didn’t discuss why patients abandon the diet or aren’t interested in the first place. Use your imagination.

Major carbohydrate restriction in type 1 diabetics significantly improves blood sugar control (decreases HgbA1c), lowers insulin requirements, and improves cardiovascular disease risk factors (increases HDL cholesterol and lowers triglycerides).

Paleo diets vary in total carbohydrate grams and percentage of calories derived from carbohydrate. Paleo diets tend to be lower in carb than usual Western diets, with 30% of total calories from carbohydrate probably a good rough estimate. The typical American eats 250 to 300 grams of carbohydrate daily, or about 50% of total calories. In the study at hand, the daily carb gram goal was 75, which would be 15% of calories for someone eating 2,000 cals/day.

Low-carb eating wasn’t very appealing to Swedes in the mid-2000s. I wonder if it’s more popular now with the popularity of LCHF dieting (low-carb, high-fat) in the general population there.

Steve Parker, M.D.

References:

1.  Nielson, J.V., Gando, C., Joensson, E., and Paulsson, C. Low carbohydrate diet in type 1 diabetes, long-term improvement and adherence: A clinical audit. Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, 2012, 4:23. http://www.dmsjournal.com/content/4/1/23

2.  O’Neill, D.F., Westman, E.C., and Bernstein, R.K. The effects of a low-carbohydrate regimen on glycemic control and serum lipids in diabetes mellitus. Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, 2003, 1(4): 291-298.

3.  Nielsen, J.V., Jönsson, E. and Ivarsson, I. A low carbohydrate diet in type 1 diabetes: clinical experience – A brief report. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, 2005, 110(3): 267-273.

What’s For Dinner? Baked Trout, Vegetable Medley, and an Apple

Trout are one of the cold-water fatty fishes loaded with the omega-3 fatty acids that are so good for our hearts and brains. Paleolithic man ate much more omega-3 and much less omega-6 fatty acids than modern man. Eating cold-water fatty fish is a great way to get back to that ancestral balance. This recipe serves two.

paleo diet, low-carb, Steve Parker MD

This hunter-gatherer snagged himself a brown trout

Ingredients:

  • trout, fresh filets, 16 oz (450 g)
  • broccoli, raw, fresh, 4.5 oz (130 g), bite-size chunks
  • cauliflower, raw, fresh 4.5 oz (130 g), bite-size chunks
  • carrots, raw, fresh, 4.5 0z (130 g), bite-size chunks
  • olive oil, extra virgin, 7 tbsp (100 ml)
  • garlic, raw, 4 cloves (12 g), thinly sliced or finely diced
  • parsley, raw, 1.5 tbsp (6 g), chopped
  • basil, fresh, 4 leaves (1.5 g), chopped
  • lemon juice, 3/4 fl oz (22 ml)
  • salt, 1/2 tsp (2.5 ml)
  • black pepper, 1 tsp (5 ml)
  • commercial low-sodium vegetable seasoning of your choice
  • apples (2), fresh, medium size, (2.75-inch or 7-cm diameter)

Instructions:

First, make a marinade. In a glass or plastic bowl, mix 5 tbsp (75 ml) of the olive oil, 3 of the diced garlic cloves (9 g), parsley, salt, pepper, lemon juice, and basil.

Place the trout in a medium sized (8 or 9-inch or 20–23 cm diameter) glass baking dish, then cover with the marinade. Let sit in the refrigerator for 1–2 hours, turning occasionally. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C). Pull the fish dish out of the refrigerator once you start the preheat process. Cover the glass dish with aluminum foil, then bake in oven for 20–40 minutes. This is a judgment all. When done, it should flake apart readily with a fork. This cooking method works well for trout salmon, cod, tilapia, and perhaps others. Consider squeezing fresh lemon juice on the cooked fish for extra zing.

paleo diet, Steve Parker MD, low-carb, vegetables

We buy this vegetable medley by the bag at Sam’s Club

Start on the vegetables about ten minutes after the fish go in the oven. Put the broccoli, cauliflower, and carrots in a microwave-safe dish, add about four fl oz (120 ml) of water, and microwave (covered) on high for four minutes. If you don’t have a cover, just use a water-moistened paper towel. While they cook, heat 2 tbsp (30 ml) of the olive oil in a medium-sized pan over medium heat (with one clove of diced garlic) for a couple minutes to release the garlic flavor. Drain the water off the microwaved vegetables, then sauté them in the olive oil pan for a couple minutes, stirring frequently. Add your commercial vegetable seasoning when you start sautéing or at any point thereafter, even at the table.

Enjoy the apple for desert.

Servings: 2

Nutritional Analysis Per Serving:

  • 59% fat
  • 16% carbohydrate
  • 25% protein
  • 840 calories
  • 36 g carbohydrate
  • 9 g fiber
  • 27 g digestible carbohydrate
  • 790 mg sodium (plus your vegetable seasoning amount)
  • 1,620 mg potassium
  • Prominent features: rich in protein, A, B6, B12, C, E, iron, manganese, niacin, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, riboflavin, selenium, thiamine, and zinc 

Recipe: Chili

If you’re making chili, you might as well make a batch you can dip into over several days. It only gets better with time (up to a point!).

Ingredients:

  • ground beef (80% lean, 20% fat), raw, 20 oz (570 g)
  • pork Italian sausage, raw, 20 oz (570 g)
  • onion, 1 large, diced
  • tomatoes, diced, canned, 14.5 oz (410 g)
  • tomato paste, 4 oz (115 g)
  • garlic, 5 cloves, peeled and thinly sliced
  • salt, 1/2 tsp (2.5 ml)
  • allspice, ground, 1/4 tsp (1.2 ml)
  • chili powder, 2 tbsp (30 ml)
  • cinnamon, ground, 1/2 tbsp (7.5 ml)
  • cayenne pepper, ground, 1/4 tsp (1.2 ml)
  • water, 1 cup (240 ml)

Instructions:

Cut the Italian sausage into small pieces. Sauté the sausage, ground beef, onion, and garlic in a large pot. Don’t just brown the meat; cook it thoroughly. When done, drain off the fat if desired (but why waste those good calories?). Add the remainder of ingredients, bring to a boil, then simmer for about an hour. Add additional water if the chili looks too thick.

Servings: 8 servings of 1-cup (240 ml) each

Nutritional Analysis Per Serving:

  • 70% fat (if not drained off after cooking)
  • 9% carbohydrate
  • 21% protein
  • 475 calories
  • 11.4 g carbohydrate
  • 2.3 g fiber
  • 9.1 g digestible carbohydrate
  • 860 mg sodium
  • 722 mg potassium
  • Prominent features: goodly amounts of protein, B12, iron, niacin, selenium, thiamine, and zinc

A Final Note:

You can make a simple meal out of this by increasing the serving size to one-and-a-half cups (360 ml) and adding a side order of peeled and sliced 7-inch (18 cm or 200 g) cucumber. The new nutritional analysis would be:

  • 68% fat
  • 10% carbohydrate
  • 21% protein
  • 780 calories
  • 23 g carbohydrate
  • 5 g fiber
  • 18 g digestible carbohydrate
  • 1,384 mg sodium
  • 1,429 mg potassium