Tag Archives: Dr. Richard Bernstein

Dr. Richard Bernstein Not a Fan of Insulin Pumps

Click for details at DiabetesHealth. Dr. Bernstein is a type 1 diabetic and one of the first users of a home blood glucose monitor. He’s most famous for recommending very-low-carb eating for folks with diabetes, in his book Diabetes Solution. An excerpt from DiabetesHealth:

I spent a month in a major insulin pump center and saw several things. Many of the female patients seemed to have wings on their sides where the pump tubing was inserted and they got lipohypertrophy [overgrown fat tissue] from localized injections, but that was the least of it. None of them actually had remotely normal blood sugars.

Dr. Richard Bernstein on the Paleo Diet for Diabetes

DiabetesHealth has a brief article on Dr. Bernstein’s view of the Paleolithic diet. They quote him thusly:

There’s no way the ADA [American Diabetes Association] diet or any high-carbohydrate and low-fat diet will enable you to control blood sugars. It turns out that the kind of diet I recommend is essentially a Paleolithic diet, which is what humanity evolved on. Our ancestors did not have bread, wheat, sweet fruits, and all of the delicious things that we have today. These have been specially manufactured for us nowadays. For food, our ancestors had a paucity of roots, some leaves, and principally meat to eat. If they lived near the shore, they had fish.

Read the rest.

Do Tomatoes Have Too Many Carbohydrates?

Eat greens for vitamin K

Looks reasonable to me

Dr. Richard Bernstein wrote a great book advocating strict carbohydrate restriction for folks with diabetes.  I’m talking about a max of 30 grams a day, compared to 250–300 g in the standard American diet.

Dr. Bernstein cautions his diabetic patients and readers of Diabetes Solution to keep a tight lid on consumption of tomatoes.  An excerpt from page 149:

If you have them uncooked in salad, limit yourself to one slice or a single cherry tomato per cup of salad.

His concern is that tomatoes will raise your blood sugar too high.

That doesn’t make sense to me.  A 3-inch diameter tomato has 7 grams of carbohydrate, 2 of which are fiber.  So the digestible carb count is only 5 grams.  That’s not much.  So do tomatoes have a high glycemic index?  Unlikely, although it’s hard to be sure.  Good luck finding a reliable GI for tomatoes on the Internet.

I think Dr. Bernstein’s wrong about this one, which is rare.  I suppose it’s possible that tomatoes deliver some other substance to the bloodstream that interferes with carbohydrate metabolism, but Dr. Bernstein doesn’t mention that.

Do tomatoes play havoc with your blood sugars?

Steve Parker, M.D.